jhc.2024.8.1.08

Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology

January 2024 Volume 8 Issue 1


Original Contribution

Evaluation of PD-L1 Immunoexpression  in Resected Samples of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: A Study on 64 Cases

1. *Dr. Israt Jahan, Lecturer, Department of Pathology, Chandpur Medical College, Chandpur, Bangladesh; isratliza424@gmail.com
2. Dr. Bishnu Pada Dey, Associate Professor, Department of Pathology, BSMMU, drbishnu@bsmmu.edu.bd
3. Dr. Md. Akhtaruzzaman, Lecturer, Department of Pathology, Pabna Medical College, Pabna, Bangladesh; akter22nd@gmail.com
4. Dr. Kassim Hagi Hussain, Senior lecturer, Department of pathology, Jazeera University Medical College, Somalia; doctorqaasim@gmail.com
5. Dr. Mahabub Alam, Assisstant Professor, Department of Pathology, Bashundhara Ad-din Medical College & Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh; mahabub.robin@gmail.com
6. Dr. Md Zillur Rahman, Professor, Department of Pathology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Shahbagh, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh;drzillur@bsmmu.edu.bd

*For correspondence

Abstract
Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and its incidence is rising steadily in developing nations. The patient prognosis for CRC remains poor, despite advances in surgery and treatment. Additionally, there are currently no reliable prognostic approaches for CRC, despite the use of conventional prognostic factors. Immune checkpoints blockades (ICB) have emerged as a promising treatment strategy and have dramatically improved long-term survival in several malignances. The “PD-1 (programmed cell death-1)”/PD-L1 (programmed cell death-ligand 1) axis plays an important role to control immune suppression by down-regulating T effector cell activities enable tumor cells to escape from the host’s anti-tumor immune surveillance. Aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of PD-L1 (28-8 clone) in resected samples of colorectal cancer.
Methods: This was a cross-sectional observational study. A total 64 cases were selected from the patients who were diagnosed as adenocarcinoma from resected samples received in the department of pathology at BSMMU from July 2021 to June 2023. Immuno-histochemical staining for PD-L1 was performed along with appropriate positive control.
Results: In this study PD-L1 immuno-expression was found in 14 (21.9%) out of 64 cases. However, no expression was found in rest of the 50 (78.1%) cases.
Conclusion: Evaluation of expression of PD-L1 may emerge as a new marker and target for the immunotherapy of colorectal cancer.

[Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology, 2024 Jan; 8 (1):56-64]
Keywords: CRC, ICB, PD-1, PD-L1, IRS.

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jhc.2024.8.1.07

Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology

January 2024 Volume 8 Issue 1


Original Contribution

Cyclin D1 Expression in Different Grades of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Study Based on Small Biopsy Samples

1. *Dr. Abu Saeed Bin Hasem, MBBS, MD (Pathology), Lecturer, Department of Pathology, Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College. saeedbinhasem@gmail.com.
2. Professor (Dr.) Azizul Qadar Md. Abdul Hye, M. Phil (Pathology), Former-Head and Professor, Department of Pathology, Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College.
3. Professor (Dr.) Shamim Akhter Mimi, M. Phil (Pathology), Head and Professor, Department of Pathology, Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College.
4. Dr. Md. Mizanur Rahman, MBBS, MD (Pathology), Assistant Professor, Pabna Medical College, Pabna.
5. Dr. Md. Shahrior Nahid, MBBS, MD (Pathology), Resident Medical Officer, National Institute of Laboratory Medicine and Referral Centre, Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Agargaon, Dhaka-1207.
6. Dr. Umama-Tun-Nesa Emita, MBBS, MD (Pathology), Pathologist, Khulna Medical College Hospital, Khulna.
7. Dr. Sadia Afroz, MBBS, MD (Pathology), Medical Officer, Department of Histopathology, National Institute of Cancer Research and Hospital, Mohakhali, Dhaka-1212.

* For correspondence

Abstract
Background: Cyclin D1 oncogene plays a critical role in various malignancies by regulating the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. Overexpression of cyclin D1 in oral squamous cell carcinoma is associated with poor prognosis and resistance to cisplatin-based conventional chemotherapy.

Objectives:To assess the immunohistochemical expression of cyclin D1 in different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and to determine the association of cyclin D1 expression with histopathological grades, age, gender, anatomic site, and the habit of using tobacco, betel quid and areca nut of OSCC patients.
Methods: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted at the Department of Pathology, Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College, Sylhet during the study period (from March, 2019 to April, 2020 and July, 2021 to April, 2022). A total of 52 small biopsy cases were processed; paraffin blocks were made and stained with routine H&E stain. The sections were examined microscopically and the tumors were graded histologically. Immunohistochemistry was performed by using a commercially available anti-cyclin D1 antibody. Cyclin D1 overexpression was considered when more than 10% of tumor cells displayed nuclear staining with moderate to strong intensity.
Results: Cyclin D1 overexpression was seen in 60% of cases of OSCC. The highest expression was seen in moderately differentiated followed by poorly differentiated and well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, with no statistically significant correlation. It did not correlate with age, gender, anatomic site, the habit of using tobacco, betel quid, and areca nut chewing.
Conclusion: In Bangladesh, 60% of cases of OSCC showed cyclin D1 overexpression which was quite similar to the findings of other countries. Further, alarge cohort study on resected samples can be done for overall survival and future targeted therapy against cyclin D1.

[Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology, 2024 Jan; 8 (1):49-55]
Keywords: Cyclin D1, Expression, OSCC, Overexpression

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jhc.2024.8.1.06

Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology

January 2024 volume 8 issue 1


Original Contribution

Association between Histomorphological Types of Hydatidiform Mole and the Expression of Ki67 Immunohistochemical Marker as well as β-hCG Level Status

1. *Dr. Sonia Hossain, MD (Pathology), Pathologist, Department of Pathology, Dhaka Medical College.
sondhisoniahossain69@gmail.com
2. Professor Roksana Jeba, Professor & Head, Department of Pathology, Dhaka Medical College.
3. Dr. Zubaida Bahroon Khan, MD (Pathology), Associate Professor, Department of Pathology, Dhaka Medical College.

*For correspondence

Abstract
Background: Hydatidiform mole (HM) is the most common type of gestational trophoblastic disease which is sub-classified into complete hydatidiform mole (CHM) and partial hydatidiform mole (PHM). Accurate subclassification of HM is very important as the development of choriocarcinoma and persistent trophoblastic diseases are more related to CHM than PHM. However, sometimes this subclassification is more challenging only based on histomorphological findings. Because there is considerable intraobserver and interobserver variability, histomorphological findings in conjunction with some complementary methods such as immunohistochemistry and biochemical markers could be helpful in the accurate interpretation of the HMs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of Ki 67 immunostain along with the pretreatment β-hCG level and to identify their association with histomorphological types of hydatidiform mole.
Methods: This cross-sectional observational study was done at Department of Pathology, Dhaka Medical College. The cases were classified into CHM and PHM based on histopathological features. Pretreatment β-hCG level noted and Ki 67 immunohistochemistry was done. The results of the cases were collected and tabulated. Statistical analysis was performed on the tabulated data using Fisher Exact test, Chi-square test and Unpaired t-test.
Results: Out of 50 cases, based on histopathological criteria, 27(54.0%) cases were CHM and 23(46.0%) were PHM. After evaluating Ki67 immunohistochemical staining, among CHM, 23(85.2%) cases showed Ki67 score-3 and 4(14.8%) cases score-2. Out of 23 PHM, 22 (95.7%) cases showed Ki -67 score-2 and 1(4.3%) case showed score-3. These were statistically significant. On the other hand, among the CHM 22 (81.5%) had β-hCG level ≥100000 mIU/ml and 5 (18.5%) had <100000 mIU/ml. Among PHM 2 (8.7%) had β-hCG ≥ 100000 mIU/ml and 91.3% had β-hCG<100000 mIU/ml. It was also statistically significant.
Conclusion: Diagnosis of HM can be improved by Ki67 labeling index and evaluation of pretreatment β-hCG level, which will help in differentiating CHM from PHM. The correct diagnosis is crucial for future treatment and follow-up of the patients.

[Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology, 2024 Jan; 8 (1):41-48]
Keywords:  Hydatidiform mole, Complete hydatidifrom mole, Partial hydatidiform mole, β-hCG, Ki67 Immunomarker

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jhc.2024.8.1.05

Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology
January 2024 Volume 8 issue 1


Original Contribution

Evaluation of Pediatric Common Solid Small Round Cell Tumors: An Immunohistochemical Study

1. Dr. Md. Shahrior Nahid, MBBS, MD(Pathology), Resident Medical Officer, Department of Pathology, National Institute of Laboratory Medicine and Referral Centre (NILMRC), Dhaka-1207. shahrior.nahid@gmail.com
2. Processor (Dr.) Ferdousy Begum, MBBS, MD (Pathology),
Professor and Ex-Chairman, Department of Pathology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka-1000.
3. Professor (Dr.) Mohammed Shahed Ali Jinnah, MBBS, MD(Pathology), Professor of Pathology, Director, National Institute of Laboratory Medicine and Referral Center, Sher-E-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka-1207.
4. Dr. Umama-Tun-Nesa Emita, MBBS, MD(Pathology), Pathologist, Khulna Medical College Hospital, Khulna.
5. Dr Md. Mahabub Alam, MBBS, MD (Pathology), Assistant Professor (Current Charge), Bashundhara Ad-din Medical College, Dhaka.
6. Dr. Arbin Siddiquea, MBBS, MD (Biochemistry), Lecturer, Department of Biochemistry, Shaheed Suhrawardy Medical College, Dhaka-1207.
7. Dr. Tasmina Anam, MBBS, MPhil (Immunology), Medical Officer, Department of Pathology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka-1000.
⃰ For correspondence

Abstract
Background: Pediatric small round cell tumors (SRCTs) are diagnostically challenging lesions due to their primitive character.  With the rising incidence and having better treatment outcome as compared to the past, the categorization of SRCTs into definitive histological types is extremely important as individual tumor differs therapeutically and has separate prognostic significance. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) can play an important role here.
Objective: The present study was designed to evaluate the role of immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the differential diagnoses of pediatric SRCTs.
Results: In this study, various histomorphological types of pediatric SRCTs were identified in about 97% of cases with the aid of immunohistochemical stains. However, about 3% of cases remain unclassified even after immunohistochemical tests. The different morphological patterns were as follows; 24.4% rhabdomyosarcoma, 22.2% lymphoblastic lymphoma, 22.2% neuroblastoma, 22.2% soft tissue Ewing sarcoma, 4.44% Wilms Tumor, and 1.48% poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma.
Conclusion: Immunohistochemistry plays an important role as is evident from the present study and supported by many previous studies in categorizing undifferentiated or poorly differentiated small round cell tumors of childhood.

[Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology, 2024 Jan; 8 (1):31-40]
Keywords: Small round cell tumors (SRCTs), Immunohistochemistry (IHC)

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jhc.2024.8.1.04

Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology

 January 2024 Volume 8 Issue 1


Original Contribution

Immunoexpression of WT1 in Astrocytoma and its Correlation with Histopathological Grade

1. *Dr. Evana Kabir, Specialist (Pathology), United Hospital Limited, Gulshan-2, Dhaka, Bangladesh; evana19901@gmail.com
2. Professor Dr. Md Rezaul Karim Dewan, Professor, Department of Pathology, Greenlife Medical College, Ex-Professor and head, Dhaka Medical College.
3. Dr. Rejwana Nahar, Assistant Professor
, Department of Pathology, Mugda Medical college, Dhaka.
4. Dr. Sadia Afroz, Medical Officer, Department of Histopathology, National Institute of Cancer Research & Hospital (NICRH), Mohakhali, Dhaka-1212, Bangladesh.
5. Dr. Shamim Rahman, Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology, Jahurul Islam Medical College, Bajitpur Bangladesh.
6. Dr. Tasmia Islam, Specialist (Pathology), Square Hospital Limited, Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka-1205, Bangladesh.
7. Dr. Khondoker Rakibul Hoque, Senior House Officer, Department of Orthopaedics, United Hospital Limited, Gulshan, Dhaka.

*For correspondence.
Abstract
Background:  Astrocytoma comprises a group of neoplasms that differ in their location in the Central nervous system, morphologic features and invasive behavior. These are therapeutically challenging for their infiltrative growth pattern, occasionally resistant to conventional therapies and invariably high grade tumors have shown poor prognosis. Moreover biological behavior of astrocytoma and chance of recurrence cannot be ruled out by histopathological evaluation alone. So, new predictive marker for determining tumor progression is at stake.
Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate WT1 expression in astrocytoma and its correlation with histological grade.
Methods:  The cross-sectional observational study was conducted in the Department of Pathology, Dhaka Medical College (DMC) from September 2019 to August 2021. Histologically diagnosed 51 cases of different grades of astrocytoma were included in this study. Immunostaining with WT1 protein was done in all cases. The data were collected and statistical analysis was done by SPSS.
Results: The mean age for grade I, II, III and IV astrocytoma’s are 14, 27.5, 38.6 and 44 years respectively. There were 30 male and 21 female patients with the ratio 1.42:1. Among 51 cases of astrocytoma’s Grade I, II ,III and IV are 10, 15, 8 and 18 in number. By Immunohistochemical study positive WT1 expression was seen in all cases of astrocytoma’s (100%). Out of 25 cases of low grade astrocytoma’s (WHO grade I and II), expression was found mild in 12 (48%) cases, moderate in 11 (54%) cases and marked only 02 (8%) cases. Regarding 26 cases of high grade astrocytoma’s (WHO grade III and IV) expression found mostly marked in 16 (61.5%) cases, moderate in 09 (34.7%) and mild only in 01 (3.8%) cases. These data shows WT1 expression increases with WHO tumor grades and significant positive (p<0.001) correlation between WT1 expression and tumor grade.
Conclusion: The study reveals positive correlation between WT1 expressions with WHO tumor grade in astrocytoma. Furthermore, evaluation of WT1 with histopathological grading may provide information about tumor progression as well as guide the clinicians for therapeutic purposes.

[Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology, 2024 Jan; 8 (1):19-30]
Keywords: Astrocytoma, tumor grade, WT1 expression, tumor progression, Glioblastoma

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jhc.2024.8.1.03

Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology

January 2024 Volume 8 Issue 1


Original Contribution

Evaluation of Immunohistochemical Expression of p53 in Colorectal Carcinoma

1. *Dr. Mahfuza Jebun  Mouri; Lecturer, Department of Pathology, Shaheed Suhrawardy Medical College, Sher-E-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka.  mouri@gmail.com.
2. Professor Dr. Enamul Kabir, Professor, Department of Pathology, Popular Medical College, Dhaka.
3. Professor Dr. Shahnaj Begum, Professor, Department of Pathology, Sir Salimullah Medical College, Dhaka.

*For correspondence
Abstract
Background: The most common gastrointestinal malignancy is colorectal carcinoma and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In colorectal carcinoma the most frequently mutated gene is p53 tumor suppressor gene. Mutation of p53 gene gives rise to abnormal protein which can be easily detected by immunohistochemistry. Expression of mutant p53 protein has been associated with poor clinical outcome and increased risk of death due to increased aggressiveness of the disease.
Objective: The aim of the study was to see the clinicopathological correlation of mutant p53 expression in colorectal carcinoma.
Method: Total 50 paraffin embedded tissue blocks of histopathologically diagnosed cases of colorectal cancer were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining for mutant p53 expression. The study was performed in Sir Salimullah Medical College, Dhaka (from March, 2018 to February, 2020).
Results: Out of 50 patients studied, 29 cases (58%) expressed mutant p53 protein in the nucleus of malignant cells. There was significant association between  p53  protein expression and clinicopathologic variables such as age (<40 years vs >40 years, p=0.032), site of tumor (left vs right colon, p=0.028), pathological type (mucinous vs non mucinous, p=0.039), grade (a greater tendency towards poor differentiation, p= 0.039), advanced stage (both TNM and Dukes), whereas no significant association was found between mutant p53 protien expression and other parameters like gender and morphological types.
Conclusion: The results of this current study revealed that mutant p53 positive colorectal cancer tended to be related to a higher grade of malignancy, advanced tumor stage and mucinous morphology. The results of this current study revealed that mutant p53 positive colorectal cancer tended to be related to a higher grade of malignancy, advanced tumor stage and mucinous morphology. So, p53 is an important immunohistochemical marker for colorectal cancer patients.

[Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology, 2024 Jan; 8 (1):10-18]
Keywords: Colorectal cancer, p53, Immunohistochemistry
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jhc.2024.8.1.02

Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology

January 2024, Volume 8 issue 1


Original Contribution

Histomorphological Pattern of Fallopian Tube Lesions in a Tertiary Care Hospital

1.*Dr. Tamanna Jannat, MBBS, MD(Pathology), Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology, Prime Medical College, Rangpur. dr.tamanna2020@gmail.com
2. Professor Dr. Ruksana Jeba, MBBS, MD (Pathology), Professor & Head, Department of Pathology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka.
3. Dr. Md. Shahrior Nahid, MBBS, MD(Pathology), Resident Medical Officer, Department of Pathology, National Institute of Laboratory Medicine and Referral Centre (NILMRC), Sher-E-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka-1207.
4. Dr. Md. Moinul Ahsan, MBBS, MD (Biochemistry), Lecturer, Department of Biochemistry, Nilphamari Medical College, Nilphamari.
*For correspondence

Abstract
Background: Fallopian tubes are a very important organ of the female reproductive system. A wide range of diseases varying from salpingitis to malignancy can affect fallopian tubes. Fallopian tube lesions are associated with infertility. Moreover, Tubal epithelium (mainly fimbria) is a potential origin of ovarian and peritoneal carcinoma.
Objective: The present study was designed to evaluate the histomorphological patterns as well as the frequency of different fallopian tube lesions.
Method: A total of 300 cases of fallopian tubes were included in this study according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. After receiving gross examination was done and relevant data were collected in preformed proforma. Tissue processing, paraffin block preparation, and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain were done according to standard protocol followed by the Pathology Department of DMC. Sections were examined by light microscopy.
Results: From this study, it was stated that pathological lesions of fallopian tubes were observed in 40% of cases which was a large number. Most of the lesions of fallopian tubes were non-neoplastic and very few neoplastic lesions were found. Most of the lesions occur at 31-40 years of age. Total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was the most common type of specimen and fibroid uterus was the most common surgical indication (60 cases 20%) followed by ovarian cyst (53 cases 17.66%). Salpingitis was the most common histopathological diagnosis, found in 47 (15.66%) cases followed by ectopic tubal pregnancy (13.33%). Primary malignancy was found in only a single patient.
Conclusion: It is necessary to do a thorough examination of fallopian tubes and give at least one block from each site. It is not only for the detection of tubal pathology but also to detect precursor lesions of the tubal epithelium (mainly fimbria) as it is the origin of ovarian or peritoneal carcinoma.

[Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology, 2024 Jan; 8 (1):3-9]

 Keywords: Fallopian tube lesions

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jhc.2024.8.1.01

Journal of histopathology and Cytopathology

January 2024, Volume 8, Issue 1


Editorial

Importance of Synoptic Reporting for Specimens with Cancer Diagnosis

Dr. Shabnam Akhter, MD (Pathology), Associate Professor, Department of Pathology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka.  akhtershabnam66@gmail.com

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Executive Committees

Bangladesh Academy of Pathology

Executive Committee 2024-2026

President: Professor Dr. Md. Nasimul Islam
President (Elect): Professor Dr. Shamiul Islam Sady
Vice president: Prof. Md. Zillur Rahman
General Secretary: Professor Dr. Shamim Akhter Mimi
Treasurer: Dr. Zubaida Bahroon Khan
President (recent past): Professor Md. Golam Mostafa
Joint Secretary: Dr. Prasun Biswas
Organizing Secretary: Dr. Mohammad Mahabubul Hoque
Office Secretary: Dr. Raquibul Hasan Kazal
Scientific Secretary: Dr. Md. Mainul Islam
Publication Secretary: Dr. Asaduzzaman

EC Members
Prof. Kazi Nishat Ara Begum
Professor Dr. Ruksana Jeba
Professor Dr. Kaniz Rasul
Prof. Md. Saidur Rahman
Professor Dr. Tareak Al Nasir
Dr. Farzana Rahman
Dr. SM Masud Alam
Dr. Mohammed Imran Hassan
Dr. Subrata Ray

 

Executive Committee 2022-2023

President:  Professor Dr. Md. Golam Mostafa
President Elect:  Professor Dr. Md. Nasimul Islam
Vice President:   Professor Dr. Ferdousy Begum
General Secretary: Professor Dr. Mohammed Shahed Ali Jinnah
Treasurer: Dr. Mohammad Masiur Rahman
Immediate Past President: Professor Ashim Ranjan Barua
Joint Secretary:  Dr.Raquibul Hasan Kazal
Scientific Secretary:  Dr. Mohammad Mahbubul Hoque
Publication Secretary: Dr. Md. Sadequel Islam Talukder

Executive Members:
Professor Dr. A Q M Abdul Hye
Professor Dr. M. Shahab Uddin Ahamad
Professor Dr. Shamim Akhter Mimi
Dr. Touhid Uddin Rupom
Dr. Taslima Hossain
Dr. Rubina Yasmin
Dr. Md.Imran Hassan
Dr. Zubaida Bahroon Khan
Dr. SaiyedaSinthia Karim
Dr. Subroto Roy
Dr. Prasun Biswas

 

 

Executive Committee 2019-2020

President: Professor Ashim Ranjan Barua
President Elect: Professor Md. Golam Mostafa
Vice President:  Professor Md. Shamiul Islam
General Secretary: Dr. AKM Nurul Kabir
Treasurer: Dr. Mashiur Rahman
Immediate Past President: Professor Kaniz Rasul
Joint Secretary: Dr. Md. Shahed Ali Jinnah
Scientific Secretary: Professor Dr. Md. Nasimul Islam
Publication Secretary: Dr. Md. Sadequel Islam Talukder
Members:
Professor Faruque Ahmed
Professor Enamul Kabir
Professor Md. Nowfel Islam
Dr. Mohammad Zillur Rahman
Dr. Kazi Nishat Ara Begum
Dr. Ferdousy Begum
Dr. Ruksana Jeba
Dr. Touhid Uddin Rupom
Dr. Md. Mahmudul Huda
Dr. Taslima Hossain
Dr. Shahab Uddin Ahmed

 

Executive Committee 2017-2018

President: Professor Kaniz Rasul
President Elect: Professor Ashim Ranjan Barua
Vice President: Professor Md. Nowfel Islam
General Secretary: Professor Md. Shamiul Islam
Treasurer: Dr. AKM Nurul Kabir
Immediate Past President: Professor Mohammad Kamal
Joint Secretary: Dr. Shamim Farooq (Titu)
Scientific Secretary: Dr. Md. Rezaul Karim Dewan
Publication Secretary: Dr. Md. Sadequel Islam Talukder
Members:
Professor Shah Monir Hossain
Professor AUM Muhsin
Professor Faruque Ahmed
Professor Md. Golam Mostafa
Professor Enamul Kabir
Dr. Mohammad Zillur Rahman
Dr. Kazi Nishat Ara Begum
Dr. Ferdousy Begum
Dr. Shamim Akhter Mimi
Dr. Shamima Ferdousi
Dr. Ruksana Jeba
Dr. Touhid Uddin Rupom
Dr. Md. Shahed Ali Jinnah
Dr. Md. Mahmudul Huda

About

The Bangladesh Academy of Pathology was officially launched and its first general meeting was held in the Department of Pathology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, on Friday, the 7th of December 2012. A total of 58 specialist pathologists from all over the country were present at the meeting. Twenty councillors were elected, amongst whom, the President, President elect, Vice President, Treasurer and General Secretary were selected for the next two years. The elected councillors were: Dr. A J E Nahar Rahman (President), Dr. Mohammed Kamal (President elect), Dr. Kaniz Rasul (Vice President), Dr. Ashim Ranjan Barua (Treasurer), and Dr. Maleeha Hussain (General Secretary), Dr. Md Sadequel Islam Talukder, Dr. S M Badruddoza, Dr. Sukumar Saha, Dr. Abed Hossain, Dr. M Shahabuddin Ahmed, Dr. AFM Saleh, Dr. PK Gosh, Dr. Shabnam Akhter, Dr. Shamiul Islam Sadi, Dr. Kamrul Hassan Khan, Dr. Farooque Ahmed, Dr Abdul Mannan Sikder, Dr. Col. Mahbubul Alam, Dr. Taslima Hossain and Dr. AUM Muhsin.

Inception of the Bangladesh Academy of Pathology

 

  1. Mohammed Kamal, VisitingProfessor, Department of Pathology, BSMMU.
  2. Maleeha Hussain, Retd Professor of Pathology, DMC.

 

 

Bangladesh Academy of Pathology (BAP), which is now a trusted stakeholder for the histopathologists of Bangladesh, started its journey in 2012 with 58 founder members. The seed of BAP planted in 2012 is now in its full bloom with 370 committed members. Before looking back into the path it has travelled, the early days of surgical pathology needs to be revisited.

 

During the period of early nineteen sixties to early nineteen seventies, surgical pathology was in its early stages in Bangladesh. Pathology was a combined department that included pathology, microbiology, biochemistry, and clinical pathology in all medical colleges except IPGMR, where pathology was a separate department.Between 1992 and1994, Microbiology became a separate department in the Medical Colleges, later on Clinical Pathology followed them.Until mid-seventies before the establishment of Labex by Dr Moinul Hossain (who left the country in early eighties) and The Medical Laboratory by Prof AJE Nahar Rahman, histopathology examination service was available only in Medical Colleges and IPGMR.

With the emergence of a new generation of pathologists, surgical pathology was gradually gaining momentum in Bangladesh. At the same time, specialists from different disciplines recognized the need for individual professional organization that would exercise scientific activities as well look after the welfare of members. Thus, members from different allied disciplines together formed the Bangladesh Society of Pathologists (BSP) to work under one umbrella. BSP functioned smoothly for one and a half decade but was gradually losing its focus as members of different disciplines began forming their societies or organizations. Between 1999 and 2008, microbiologists, medical biochemists, and laboratory medicine personnel formed their respective associations.

 

The journey of Histopathologists through BSP, Asia Pacific Association of Societies of Pathologists (APASP), and SACH also paved the way for forming a separate association. After several meeting and conferences,in2012SAARC Association of Cytopathologists and Histopathologists (SACH) was formed with members from SAARC countries. Along with these shared experiences, scientific activities focusing on surgical pathology was expanding.In 2011, the Histopathologists of Bangladesh recognized the need of a separate platform to enhance the scientific and professional status of specialists in teaching, training, and practicing Histopathology. A few senior pathologists conceptualized forming BAP and disseminated the idea among histopathologists in Bangladesh. A study group was formed with the initiation of Prof. Mohammed Kamal to work on the constitution for a dedicated organization of Histopathologists. Dr. Maleeha Hussain was assigned the responsibility of making a draft constitution which she accepted gracefully.

 

The name ‘Bangladesh Academy of Pathology (BAP)’ was proposed for the new organization.

After reviewing constitutions of surgical pathology societies of other countries and Divisions of the International Academy of Pathology (IAP) in neighboring and other countries, a draft constitution was proposed for the new organization, wheremembership criteria, the structure of the office bearers and the election procedure were outlined based on IAP guidelines . This was done so that the organization can achieve international recognition and affiliation of IAP in the future.

From 2011 to 2012, there were many discussions in small groups, on proposed constitutions and refinements were made to the membership criteria and the election procedure to form an inclusive committee where histopathologists from Cox’s Bazar toDinajpur can have representation.

 

The proposed organization had the following objectives: 1. To promote the knowledge and skill of histopathologists. 2. To uphold the interests of histo and cytopathologists. 3. To organize meetings, congresses, lectures, seminars, workshops, etc. to disseminate the latest information related to histopathology. 4. To foster education in histopathology in different institutions. 5. To initiate affiliation with the International Academy of Pathology (IAP) and other organizations. The draft constitution was distributed among the histopathologists to have comments, suggestions and recommendations.

 

A meeting was held on 7th December, 2012, at the Department of Pathology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University with the aim of forming the BAP. The meeting was attended by 58 specialist pathologists from across the country. The proposed constitution was adopted through a popular vote by raising of hands and the signatures of the 58 founder members, officially launching the ‘Bangladesh Academy of Pathology’. After that the first general meeting was held at the same venue, followed by the first election to elect 20 councillors, who in turn elected the first office bearers of BAP.

 

During the council meeting, the councillors elected the new office bearers for the upcoming two years. The newly elected office bearers were Dr. A J E Nahar Rahman as President, Dr. Mohammed Kamal as President-elect, Dr. Kaniz Rasul as Vice President, Dr. Ashim Ranjan Barua as Treasurer and Dr. Maleeha Hussain as General Secretary. The following councilors were also elected: Dr. Md Sadequel Islam Talukder, Dr. S M Badruddoza, Dr. Sukumar Saha, Dr. Abed Hossain, Dr. M Shahabuddin Ahmed, Dr. AFM Saleh, Dr. PK Ghosh, Dr. Shabnam Akhter, Dr. Shamiul Islam Sadi, Dr. Kamrul Hassan Khan, Dr. Farooque Ahmed, Dr. Abdul Mannan Sikder, Dr. Col. Mahbubul Alam, Dr. Taslima Hossain, and Dr. AUM Muhsin. The council also issued a press release regarding the same.

 

The office of BAP was functioning without a proper logo until Prof. Kamal took the responsibility of designing one. He presented a few logo samples, and one was approved by the committee before the 1st National Convention on 4th December, 2014. The BAPprogressedsmoothly with much enthusiasm, except for the lengthy registration process. In 2016, Brigadier Dr. Mahbubul Alam, as General Secretary of BAP and Professor Paritosh Kumar Ghosh successfully completed the registration of BAP. Another significant milestone was the launch of ‘The Journal of Histopathology and Cytopathology’ in January 2017, which has been running successfully for last eight years. Although BAP achieved many accomplishments, there is still much to be done, including improvement of histopathology and cytology services, providing training in sub-specialties, affiliation with IAP, continuing medical education, quality assurance of the training within the country, upgrading the JHC to a high impact journal, and safeguarding the interest of themembers.

 

The founding members of BAP have given up their time,energy, and passion to make BAP a fast growing, well reputed organization in the country. Now it is the aspiring young pathologists who are to carry the torch of BAP and the seniors are always by their side to cheer, inspire and guide. Let BAP be the voice of the Histopathologists of Bangladesh and the architect to shape their professional future.

 

 

“Excellence is never an accident. It is always the result of high intention, sincere effort, and intelligent execution; it represents the wise choice of many alternatives – choice, not chance, determines your destiny” – Aristotle.